Getting To Know Tuesday Knight Interview

1. Where did the name Tuesday Knight come from?

So it's definitely not exciting as it sounds. I use to go by my government name Shane Jackson. I always thought it sounded plain and generic. I mean Jackson is the most common name ever. It doesn't sound too rapper-ish I guess. Before I put my first mixtape I needed a rap name that I was going to stick to. And I couldn't think of anything and it happened to be Tuesday night. I was in the studio with my manager and I was explaining what do you think about the name Tuesday Night? There's a bunch of metaphor ways I can play that name. He was like "yo that's kind of dope." So I just kept Tuesday Night. That's when I chose the right name.

2. Can you describe yourself in three words?

Creative, passionate, and humble.

3. What college did you attend and what was your major?

I graduated from Cornell University and I went The School of Hotel Administration. My degree is in Hotel Administration.

4. How long after working did you realize that you wanted to do music instead?

I was working him in Manhattan at Warner Brothers for 3 1/2 years straight out of college, after I graduated, December 31, 2016.

5. How long have you been writing and rapping?

For fun, I would say I started between 13 and 14 years old. But seriously tried to make it a career I would say, about two years ago.

6. Where did your inspiration for the album come from?

My recent album spoke about the transition from corporate to music. So definitely this album was straight pool of inspiration from my real life. I just want to share the thought process behind my decision. If anybody else is going through this and having to make a hard decision in life, just do what makes you happy and what inspires you. It's basically what the album is about.

7. Do you have a special place for your writing?

No, I never really write down my lyrics either. I just constantly think about my lyrics. Everything is in my head so I could be walking and I can see things. Like nature inspired me to [to write]. I can see something while driving my car and say I can make that a dope line. I'm just constantly fighting constantly thinking things that I can say at a later time throughout my career; where people would say that I'm smart because I went to school and be able to leave a memory. I used to remember everything that the teacher said. I never took notes or anything. I can come up with a rap in my head whenever. I don't know I just have a good memory.

8. Do you have an artist that inspires you? Who?

I always go back to Nas, just because that was my introduction to hip-hop. I was born in the early 90s and it was huge. I have two brothers and we was bumping his music. So I was really brought up on listening to Nas. I knew all of his tracks and I was like 5 or 6 years old. That's what inspired me to start especially my style is the way he told stories in his rhymes. Now is definitely the inspiration for me.

9. What's the difference between the corporate industry and the music industry?

The ability to be creative. Which was what was holding me back from falling in love with the corporate industry. You have a boss to tell you what to do and usually there's only one way to do it. I just tell you do it this way. With rap I can be creative, do things the way I want to do them and how I think they should be done.

10. Where do you see yourself in 5 and 10 years?

Five years from now I just want to be making decent amount of money and music so I don't need another job. I'm real humble I don't care about being a millionaire and all that other stuff. If I could make $120 grand off of writing music even ghostwriting for other people. I would be completely content. Ten years from now I will be 36, I hope to take the rent money which is like entry level money and start investing in other things. Have my own businesses and have a family fortune, to include my family and friends and make sure all our bodies are good.

11. What do you want your legacy to be?

I want my legacy to be, that I was a relatable. I was able to make people feel what I was saying. I just want people to be able to relate to my music. And help them get through certain situations in life through my music. That's what I want my legacy to be.

12. Is there anything that your fans should look forward to seeing from you in the near future?

I'm currently working on two separate mixtapes. 2 to 5 track EP’s. There's a day vibe and a night vibe. I've already started working on my next album but who knows how long that's going to take.

NEW MUSIC: BIG SEAN – NO MORE INTERVIEWS


Big Sean released a song yesterday called, “No More Interviews” that had the Internet going wild. In the song big Sean addresses all the rumors that’s going around on social media. He also goes into saying that individuals that read these sites, take what they say to be a fact without fact checking. He addressed multiple situations that his name is been brought up in. One of which was his supposed rival with, rapper Kid Cudi. What I got from what he said is that they never really had a problem but if they did it would have been because of miscommunication. He also points out that with a simple conversation whatever that disagreement was could be fixed.  
The conclusion of No More Interviews is that he’s no longer going to do interviews that asked him about his personal life. He wants all interviews to be strictly about music or any business venture that he may be apart of. I had to say I respect that, because a lot of times now interviewing don’t ask questions that they need to be asking. They’ll ask one or two questions about the music and then the rest are about the personal life or scandals or whatever may go to media. I do watch interview sometimes and think that if I was the person sitting there I would get up and walk out. Although I understand that sometimes you have to ask certain questions that are boiling up and people want to know but sometimes these outlets go to far. At the end of the day these artist, entertainers,actors and actresses are human, and they still have feelings.
I’m happy that he took the route he did to address some of the things that bothered him.
I remember when he came out with I don’t fuck with you, I was really disappointed because I didn’t expect him to address the situation in that way. Although I don’t know him, I have watched a lot of his interviews. When I saw this song yesterday, I was releaved because this is how I wanted him to address situations. 

Take a listen to the song, and tell me what you think. 
https://soundcloud.com/bigsean-1/no-more-interviews-1

Drake Talks About The Media in NEW Interview EVR Radio

drake-elliott-wilson

Drake makes it clear in his interview today, with Rap Radar’s Elliott Wilson at East Village Radio, that he is not a big fan of the media. He also talks about some of the stories in the media about him.

Catch the highlights below:

On why he doesn’t do a lot of media:
Media, it’s just all entrapment. I’m not in the entrapment game. I came up here today because we actually have rapport, we’re friends, and you’ve always shown me respect but everything else is entrapment. People just go up to radio, start talking too much and make mistakes.

On Chris Brown
For any media outlet that listens to this interview, don’t ask me sh-t about that man when I come up there. Leave that man alone and stop preying on his insecurities man. His insecurities are the fact that I make better music than him, that I’m more popping than him, and that at one point in life ,the woman that he loves fell into my lap and I did what a real n-gga would do and treated her with respect. So she’s not out there talking down on me. All of those things combined creates a n-gga that comes up to your radio station and is just gonna do dumb sh-t. But it shouldn’t be about tearing that man down, it shouldn’t be about wanting to see me and him tear each other down. We have an issue and it’s either gonna drag out, or maybe in ten years we’ll laugh about it over drinks, but let us solve that sh-t. It’s not me and Kendrick [Lamar], it’s not me and Hov, you’re not gonna get anything out of it. I don’t wanna hear that man rap, you know what I’m saying? Nobody wants to hear me rap against him, you’re not even going to get anything out of it. I just urge media to leave that sh-t alone.

What do people wanna see from it? You don’t wanna see two black men tearing each other down. I understand when it’s entertaining, when you feel that you might get some music out of it, but at the end of the day, nothing good can come of that situation, just leave that sh-t alone. That’s part of the reason why I don’t go up to radio. Sit up there and talk, talk, talk, I don’t wanna talk. People talk themselves into a mess. Playing my beat when he comes up there and try to get him to rap, c’mon man! That sh-t is like terrible.

I feel for him too. Every interview he does, they talk about me. It is what it is. I’m focused on this album and everything else that’s going on. I’m not thinking about that man…or that girl.

On being involved in beef and gossip
If it’s anything to do with me, if I ain’t say it [out of my mouth], chances are [I didn’t say it].  Their job is to create stories. It’s not like I’m in some anti-media space. I just hate when it fuels people’s days. Get out of the house. F-ck all that bullsh-t.  At the end of the day, we are just two guys and a girl. We are regular people too. You shouldn’t care that much.

On taking responsibility for his rhymes
Just realizing that when I get in that booth, not only is the microphone on, but the microphone is on. The world is listening. I think the situation the other day with the Rocko song is a wake up call for all of us. Rap is important. The world is listening. It’s a wake up call. If you are going to say something that is going to put you at risk, make sure it’s a message worth fighting for. Not to scrutinize Rick Ross, I know him very well, that’s my guy, by all means I don’t mean to speak on another man’s situation, but just for me, it clicked, like “Wow!” And watching [Tu]pac, he felt like that message was worth fighting for. In this day and age, he would have lost corporate sponsorships and he would have lost money, but he thought that message was worth fighting for.

On why he doesn’t do a lot of endorsement deals
We love saying “No.” That’s why we are still here and we are still exciting. Preserving the brand and not just jumping out there doing every single thing that’s offered to me for a million dollars. To me a million dollars isn’t worth the mystique that I still possess when I drop a record. I don’t want to be in your face all of the time doing bubble gum ads and ads for trash bags. I’m not just going to take the first million dollar check that you give me. I’ll make a million dollars somewhere else to preserve the integrity that I still have.

On if he and The Weeknd parted ways
I mean, not necessarily. OVO was OVO and will always be OVO. All we did was embrace someone that we felt was extremely talented from our city and instead of hating on it and rejecting it, we completely embraced it and that was a big part of why it is where it is now. I mean, people make their own decisions. He went on to do something that he felt was a great decision and more power to him. I talk to him all of the time and I look forward to what he has coming in the future. I wouldn’t call it a parting of ways, I just think people reach a point when they need to make decisions and whatever decisions they make, that’s on him. OVO was always three letters and it will always stay like that.

Listen To Full Interview Here!

I understand where Drake is coming from. Its horrible that the media always tries to stir up lies about these artist. They are people and do have feeling too. Like Drake said if there’s drama between two artist let them figure it out on their own.

Drake seems like he’s in a good place mentally. I’m proud of him and wish him all blessings! OnPointCeleb! MuaH! 🙂