Getting To Know Tuesday Knight Interview

1. Where did the name Tuesday Knight come from?

So it's definitely not exciting as it sounds. I use to go by my government name Shane Jackson. I always thought it sounded plain and generic. I mean Jackson is the most common name ever. It doesn't sound too rapper-ish I guess. Before I put my first mixtape I needed a rap name that I was going to stick to. And I couldn't think of anything and it happened to be Tuesday night. I was in the studio with my manager and I was explaining what do you think about the name Tuesday Night? There's a bunch of metaphor ways I can play that name. He was like "yo that's kind of dope." So I just kept Tuesday Night. That's when I chose the right name.

2. Can you describe yourself in three words?

Creative, passionate, and humble.

3. What college did you attend and what was your major?

I graduated from Cornell University and I went The School of Hotel Administration. My degree is in Hotel Administration.

4. How long after working did you realize that you wanted to do music instead?

I was working him in Manhattan at Warner Brothers for 3 1/2 years straight out of college, after I graduated, December 31, 2016.

5. How long have you been writing and rapping?

For fun, I would say I started between 13 and 14 years old. But seriously tried to make it a career I would say, about two years ago.

6. Where did your inspiration for the album come from?

My recent album spoke about the transition from corporate to music. So definitely this album was straight pool of inspiration from my real life. I just want to share the thought process behind my decision. If anybody else is going through this and having to make a hard decision in life, just do what makes you happy and what inspires you. It's basically what the album is about.

7. Do you have a special place for your writing?

No, I never really write down my lyrics either. I just constantly think about my lyrics. Everything is in my head so I could be walking and I can see things. Like nature inspired me to [to write]. I can see something while driving my car and say I can make that a dope line. I'm just constantly fighting constantly thinking things that I can say at a later time throughout my career; where people would say that I'm smart because I went to school and be able to leave a memory. I used to remember everything that the teacher said. I never took notes or anything. I can come up with a rap in my head whenever. I don't know I just have a good memory.

8. Do you have an artist that inspires you? Who?

I always go back to Nas, just because that was my introduction to hip-hop. I was born in the early 90s and it was huge. I have two brothers and we was bumping his music. So I was really brought up on listening to Nas. I knew all of his tracks and I was like 5 or 6 years old. That's what inspired me to start especially my style is the way he told stories in his rhymes. Now is definitely the inspiration for me.

9. What's the difference between the corporate industry and the music industry?

The ability to be creative. Which was what was holding me back from falling in love with the corporate industry. You have a boss to tell you what to do and usually there's only one way to do it. I just tell you do it this way. With rap I can be creative, do things the way I want to do them and how I think they should be done.

10. Where do you see yourself in 5 and 10 years?

Five years from now I just want to be making decent amount of money and music so I don't need another job. I'm real humble I don't care about being a millionaire and all that other stuff. If I could make $120 grand off of writing music even ghostwriting for other people. I would be completely content. Ten years from now I will be 36, I hope to take the rent money which is like entry level money and start investing in other things. Have my own businesses and have a family fortune, to include my family and friends and make sure all our bodies are good.

11. What do you want your legacy to be?

I want my legacy to be, that I was a relatable. I was able to make people feel what I was saying. I just want people to be able to relate to my music. And help them get through certain situations in life through my music. That's what I want my legacy to be.

12. Is there anything that your fans should look forward to seeing from you in the near future?

I'm currently working on two separate mixtapes. 2 to 5 track EP’s. There's a day vibe and a night vibe. I've already started working on my next album but who knows how long that's going to take.

NEW MUSIC: Drake – Summer Sixteen

Drake’s new track “Summer Sixteen”, is obviously getting his fans prepared for what he has planned for the new year. He also doesn’t fail to mention how his success has grown and how he has now become like Jay ad has a bigger pool than Kanye.

Drake knows what he is capable of and he is letting the world know. Love it! OnPointCeleb!

Click Here to LISTEN

 

NEW MUSIC: Snoop Lion ft. Miley Cyrus – Ashtrays and Heartbreak

Snoop Lion is pining about the past on his latest Reincarnated track, and he brought Miley Cyrus along for the ride. Their duet, off the rapper’s April 23 album, made it to the Internet on Wednesday (April 3).

On “Ashtrays and Heartbreaks,” Snoop combines his new found Rasta style with Cyrus’ pop sound but the actress shows she can get in on the reggae vibe of the jam, too, especially on lines like “fill up all those ashtrays.”

Produced by Major Lazer, Ariel Rechtshaid and Dre Skull, the track features additional vocals from Angela Hunte. The legendary drummer for the Police, Stewart Copeland, provides the island-tinged percussion on the tune.

“[Snoop] was really studying Bob Marley,” Major Lazer’s Diplo explained to MTV News last year. “He likes to have the female backing vocals, and it’s a real Marley-esque vibe. We [also] have some West Coast attitude with the production, and I’m really excited about it. It sounds amazing.”

But “Ashtrays and Heartbreaks” is hardly the only Snoop/Miley collab the world will get to hear this year. Miley has confirmed that Snoop will also appear on the lead single off her 2013 album release.

“I did a song with Snoop, and it’s coming out very, very soon,” Miley told Ryan Seacrest last month. “I can finally say I’m going to have a song with Snoop Dogg coming very soon. It’s recorded, done. I’m so excited!” While she didn’t offer up many details about the song, she did reveal that she was making plans to hang out with him at the time. “He was in Europe when he was recording, but he’s here this weekend, so I’m pretty excited. I’m think I’m going to take a bunch of my friends and go hang out.”

Are you feeling  the track? OnPoint or NOT??? Leave a comment with your opinion. MuaH!

via MTV

OnPointCelebz Interviews Singer Tia Ferrera

OPC: What made you want to pursue a career in the music industry?

T: Wow! I grew up around music. My mom is a professional singer and most of my family members are in the music industry. From being very little I’ve always been around music. I fell in love with it at a very young age.(Laughing) I feel like there was no other way for me to go.

OPC: How long have you been singing? When did you discover you had the ability to sing?

T: I started off singing at my grandfathers church. He has a very very small church in San Diego California where I was born. Started singing there once he gave me my solo I was like oh yeah (Laughing). This is me, this is what I want to do. I don’t want to do anything else in life. I knew pretty early that, that was from watching music videos and all the people I admired, I knew very very early that it was something I wanted to do.

OPC: Who is your #1 inspiration?

T: Mariah Carey

OPC: Who would you love to work with in the industry?

T: Timbaland or Ryan Leslie

OPC: From what you’ve seen or heard, what makes a professional artist? An ideal superstar?

T: Someone who is very well rounded as far as their gift. Whether they have [tackled] the technical side as well as just being free enough to express themselves. There are people that have master both of those as well as being able to network and run a great business. It seems to me that those are the most successful in the entertainment industry. Their able to balance all of those different areas of their lives and stay on top even though its a lot. Its a lot to try and balance but from what I see the people that are very successful are able to balance all of that.

OPC: What has been your favorite part of your Journey so far?

T: I have to be really honest other people wouldn’t say they do it for the feed back [but that’s why I do it. I love when someone can relate to my music]. Its just a song in my head until I go in the studio and record it and its just a song until I preform it and its just a song until someone hears it. But if it actually means something to somebody else that the whole reason i do it.

OPC: What song have you gotten the most feed back on?

T: Its weird because for women its this song that I have called ‘Its Complicated’ and its specifically about how a relationship goes wrong and your like what the heck happen we were doing so well. And I got that from all the people on Facebook land that had a status that said its complicated. I started seeing peoples comments saying what does that mean. And not everyone wants to admit it but everyone has been in that part of their relationship where their like I don’t know if were still together or whats happening so I wrote a song about that. From women I get the most feedback about that. And then I have another song that we shot the video for and its called ‘Ladies Night’. For a very strange reason a lot of guys (laughing) like that song. Their like I know I’m not supposed to dance to I know its a song for women but I like that song. Its very opposite ends of the spectrum but I love it.

OPC: Do you have a special zone you get in when your writing?

T: I do have a special zone. It depends on what kind of song it is but I specifically try to take myself to a place that I’ve experienced. When writing a song or singing a song, what ever the subjects about I try to take myself to that place. So if its one of those sad songs I literally take myself to that bad, dark, not so good place. [I start] from there to make the emotion come out.

OPC: What do you want your legacy to be?

T: I hope that when its all send and done. When I’m old and grey and can’t do this anymore. I hope that what people just got from me is that I wasn’t afraid to go against the green and follow the dream that I’ve had since I was little. No matter what it cost me or what obstacles I’ve met. That’s what I stand for.